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  1. #1

    Driver door wiring harness

    Sorry if this has been addressed before, I couldn't find anything on the subject of harnesses. So, I have the typical drivers side door releases don't work (interior and exterior handles). I have read that the harness in the door jamb are usually the culprit. I looked and it looks like there have been some Jerry rigging there already. So, with that said, is there anywhere I can buy a new (or good used) drivers side door wiring harness? I would rather replace than do more wiring operations, however if I do it myself I will solder and heat shrink all wires I repair.
    Also, Is there a more permanent solution to these fragile wires? Like an improved harness?

    Thanks,
    G. Weir

    P.S.
    2000 RT/10

  2. #2
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    How are the harnesses fragile? To use your description. It's the same wire that powers the lights and the engine. The radio and the air bag. If the door wiring is fragile then so is the rest of the wire and your car is therefore a dangerous rolling safety concern that should be removed from the road for the survival of everyone. Or, maybe wires that constantly are required to bend, just wear out.

    Used ones are available from the dismantling yards like Scharf and X2.

    Be safe.
    Red. Because I didn't have to settle for blue.

  3. #3
    That is why they are fragile, they break at the point they are placed (I own 11 other cars with wires the same place and they don't break). Didn't mean to ruffle your feathers, it just seems from what I have read they break (at that place) pretty regularly. I was just curious if someone found a solution since dismantling yards will eventually run out and none of our doors will work.

    Thank you for your reply though.

  4. #4
    A different question. Is the left harness the same as the right since there are really no difference in controls?

  5. #5
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    BlueRoadster, most of the guys I know locally have taken the time to splice in new wires into that critical area...and they have been both successful and happy long term.
    I don't send or receive "PM's" since I prefer DIRECT communication.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRoadster View Post
    Didn't mean to ruffle your feathers...
    Too funny. Don't worry about Dave's feathers...his skin is thick and his head is too!
    2001 VRY RT/10

  7. #7
    Thanks guys, do I need to lengthen the wires for more movement? Or is there any other way to help prevent this again?

    Thanks again.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRoadster View Post
    Thanks guys, do I need to lengthen the wires for more movement? Or is there any other way to help prevent this again?

    Thanks again.
    I have zero experience with this particular issue, but I'm guessing that many years of flexing the wires during door opening and closing strain-hardened them and led to failure. I'd also guess that many old vehicles would suffer from this. The old Jeep Cherokees sure did.

    If you replaced as much of the old wiring with new wires, I think it would help. Not sure if grades of copper are more ductile in today's wire, but at least a freshening would help a lot. Reset the fatigue cycle, so to speak.

    Second thought... there's not exactly a lot of room in there, I bet, so the wires are pretty taught and don't have much slack in the hinge area. I'd just do what I could to give as much slack in there as you could. Some strain loops could help too, but again, no experience, so don't know what kind of room you have.
    TA 37/93. 55,897 miles.
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  9. #9
    Thank you very much Bryan Savage, that is helpful. I was kinda thinking that too from Steve-Indys' reply.

  10. #10
    Well this is my fix for the door. I decided if this ever happens again I will only need to replace the 18" harness between the door and the under dash harness. I mad two harnesses so I could get the harnesses through the openings.

    Grant

    IMG_2720.jpg

  11. #11
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    This is Chrysler using the wrong wire for the application. If I recall correctly the wires are a seven strand wire. The fact that these wires are subjected to being pulled absolutely tight and then bent 180 degrees with each door cycle makes them subject to a very short life cycle. A wire designed for high cycling in machinery applications would be a far better choice.

  12. #12
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    This may help some of you understand why a finer strand wire would have been the better choice.

    https://www.cicoil.com/flat-cable/le...gh-flexibility

  13. #13
    I actually used a multi stranded wire as I thought the same thing. The larger the gauge the more susceptible to breakage. I didn't want to use a larger gauge wire (without completely rewiring the whole harness) due to voltage dropoff.
    I also soldiered every connector as well as crimped. I wanted a very good and solid contact.

    Thanks,
    Grant
    Last edited by BlueRoadster; 08-25-2019 at 10:37 PM.

  14. #14
    Having owned my ACR since 2011 I've noticed the odd flaky problem with the door. Sometimes it won't open or unlock. Sometimes it would open on it's own. Once it did it on a turn and the door swung open.

    While it was parked for the ROE supercharger install I thought I would tackle the wiring. At first I thought I would just repair the wiring.

    The cost of the new harness isn't cheap but after looking at the horror of what someone else had attempted I decided to go new.

    The boot was cut from end to end. It had paint over-spray from a previous repair. The wires were just a mess. A new harness was ordered.

    It wasn't cheap. Over $700 Canadian was the retail price. My cost was $475 with tax. Steep but worth the piece of mind was I complete it.

    I didn't have time to install it as of yet as a battery install and a new fuel filter were the festivities of the evening.

    Pics for your viewing pleasure.






  15. #15

  16. #16






    Started the job yesterday and finished it up tonight.

    Took about 2 hours with taking the panel off, replacing the wiring, cleaning up underneath the door panel, and reinstalling everything.

    Tools used are in the picture. Screwdriver, assorted trim tools, YMMV on what to use but I found the longer tool handy.

    Started removing the clip under the dash. Be flexible. If you are 300lbs may I suggest getting a helper. Being a contortionist helps as well. Remove the harness by prying it out. It's held on by the christmas tree barbed plastic fasteners. Once removed it's a alot easier.
    That way it gives you access to undo the red tab and unclip the harness. You can then feed it up out of the dash.

    Undo the philips screws hold the door panel on. Carefully finesse the panel off the door. Once removed make a mental note or take pics for your reference for general wire placement after you remove it.
    It is self explanatory. All plugs do follow certain plugs and distances to clip them in after. You just want to make sure you don't mistakenly put wiring in the window path.

    Mirror was easier to remove for access to clip. It feels like you could undo it from inside. Don't. Just take 30 seconds and a 10mm ratchet with extension and remove the mirror.

    Once wiring is removed feed new wiring into door all the way first. Roughly place the wiring where it should go. Feed dash end into dash and make sure boot is seated in the correct position.

    From there just start plugging in the wiring and attaching it where you removed it.

    Test window for movement and wire clearance. If ok and everything works start to reinstall panel.

    I used new sealer/dum dum on the water barrier. It's a Nissan part number on the box. If you can't find dum dum/butyl anywhere just call up Nissan. Can't remember how much it was but I had it lying around from some previous installation.

    Also in the picture is some 3M double sided tape. The thin clear kind. I used some on the top edge where the water barrier folds over the top. My original tape was dried and crusty. Put some new stuff on and was good to go.

    Put the panel on and attached all the screws. Done and the new boot looks great compared to the old one.

  17. #17
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    Nice work, Dan!

    There sure is a lot more wiring in the Gen I/II door than I would have thought.
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  18. #18
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    Where did you find the harness? I had no success finding one.

  19. #19
    I just ordered if from my local dealer.

    But it wasn't recent. Not sure of local stock anymore.


 

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