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Thread: Simulators

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    Simulators

    For you hardcore fast guys that use Sim's, what setups do you have? Do you have motion etc? One monitor or 3? Do they really help you?
    I'm doing Long Beach Grand Prix in September in between Indy car sessions and we get ZERO practice and only 3 total sessions. So need to learn the track before I get there to not be embarrassingly slow in front of 250,000 spectators and millions on TV. I never thought I'd use a sim, but I kinda have no choice now.

    Thanks.
    @9literviper 2013 track car, 2016 ACR, 1996 GTS, 2001 RT/10, 2003 SRT/10

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    I've used a wide range from $5k to $50k.

    The motion rigs are neat, but they still don't give you the same butt feel. Steering wheels with direct drive have come a long way.

    The hardest thing to translate from a sim to real life is your eyes and turning your head. Maybe VR sims have helped with that some.

    I'd suggest a modest Fanatec setup with a 49" curved wide angle monitor. Do all of the measurements so things are where they should visually. That should get you close enough where you can figure the rest out during the first session.

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    I go to a place that has a huge pro sim. Screen is like 10ft wide. Pro driver gives me tips. Best way to go

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    I use VR. I have an Oculus. Most immersive to me. I use an inexpensive motion rig. Cheap, like 12k all in. First ones I looked at were like 100k and for me I could not justify that kind of spend for a game. Mine is a DOF Reality P6. Fanatec DD1 wheel, GT car wheel with flappy paddles, Fanatec pedals. Computer is an HP gaming computer and it works fine. I use it to learn tracks and as well as drive on the tracks ahead of events.

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    Motion is not necessary. Look at the F1 guy's setups - Lando, LeClerc, Russell, etc - all stationary sims at their homes. A good wheel and pedals are nice, but even on a cheap logitech G29 I can set competitive times. Right now I play on a 65" tv. I've played on much better resolution monitors, 3 screen setups, and curved screens, none of which really gain any lap time but all of which are a little different to get used to. Go-to game is iRacing, though F12018 has been a favorite as well. Eventually I will do a VR setup as I built my rig to be able to, just haven't done the last setup and picked a VR goggle setup yet.

    TLDR - Don't go crazy picking what to use, whatever setup you go with you will adapt to and be just fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pMak26 View Post
    Motion is not necessary. Look at the F1 guy's setups - Lando, LeClerc, Russell, etc - all stationary sims at their homes. A good wheel and pedals are nice, but even on a cheap logitech G29 I can set competitive times. Right now I play on a 65" tv. I've played on much better resolution monitors, 3 screen setups, and curved screens, none of which really gain any lap time but all of which are a little different to get used to. Go-to game is iRacing, though F12018 has been a favorite as well. Eventually I will do a VR setup as I built my rig to be able to, just haven't done the last setup and picked a VR goggle setup yet.

    TLDR - Don't go crazy picking what to use, whatever setup you go with you will adapt to and be just fine.
    Your advice is rock solid if you're wanting to play.. Cable is wanting to try and get a grasp to actual tracks he'll drive on. A Logitech set will not suit his needs.

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    All good stuff here guys, thanks!!!
    @9literviper 2013 track car, 2016 ACR, 1996 GTS, 2001 RT/10, 2003 SRT/10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 13COBRA View Post
    Your advice is rock solid if you're wanting to play.. Cable is wanting to try and get a grasp to actual tracks he'll drive on. A Logitech set will not suit his needs.
    Kind of agree to disagree. iRacing, and other sims, are great for learning the track and it's layout. That's really about it. Even a Logitech wheel will be good enough to suit that need. Anyway, there are much better wheel and pedal setups out there and it's not like anyone on this forum is hurting for $, so yeah, get something half decent like Fanatec Clubsport V3 pedals and CSL Elite wheel (go Podium wheel if you want to spend extra).

    As far as motion sims, consensus seems to be the stationary sim with a proper screen setup is better on the brain and correlation. For instance, a friend of mine is F1 bound and his main sim is a 7' tall 15' diameter half round screen but the f3 car chassis he's sat in is stationary.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pMak26 View Post
    Kind of agree to disagree. iRacing, and other sims, are great for learning the track and it's layout. That's really about it. Even a Logitech wheel will be good enough to suit that need. Anyway, there are much better wheel and pedal setups out there and it's not like anyone on this forum is hurting for $, so yeah, get something half decent like Fanatec Clubsport V3 pedals and CSL Elite wheel (go Podium wheel if you want to spend extra).

    As far as motion sims, consensus seems to be the stationary sim with a proper screen setup is better on the brain and correlation. For instance, a friend of mine is F1 bound and his main sim is a 7' tall 15' diameter half round screen but the f3 car chassis he's sat in is stationary.
    I don't disagree with what you're saying, but the direct drive wheels really help you 'feel' the pitch of the road and gives you something to gauge a true lap off of; in my opinion.

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    sims are ok and they have their application especially now with GPS mapping of entire tracks all the way down to the seam sealer and even cracks and chips in concrete walls. In car video also helps to study.

    You will do fine at LBGP you have some experience and im guessing your comfortable with your car . Biggest problem for drivers on a street course are the concrete barriers/walls. If you arent comfortable with walls and zero run off its going to be intimidating. There is no real way to train for it other then to just do it. Only place that is kinda like a street course on the west coast is sears point driver comfortable there has less problems at street courses. Also Street courses you have to be extremely aggressive especially if you shit the bed in qualifying; If your racing just for fun then skip the aggressive part and just wait let the race come to you and just have fun. Street courses also beat the shit out of the drive train

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    Quote Originally Posted by TKO MOTORSPORTS TEAM View Post
    sims are ok and they have their application especially now with GPS mapping of entire tracks all the way down to the seam sealer and even cracks and chips in concrete walls. In car video also helps to study.

    You will do fine at LBGP you have some experience and im guessing your comfortable with your car . Biggest problem for drivers on a street course are the concrete barriers/walls. If you arent comfortable with walls and zero run off its going to be intimidating. There is no real way to train for it other then to just do it. Only place that is kinda like a street course on the west coast is sears point driver comfortable there has less problems at street courses. Also Street courses you have to be extremely aggressive especially if you shit the bed in qualifying; If your racing just for fun then skip the aggressive part and just wait let the race come to you and just have fun. Street courses also beat the shit out of the drive train
    Yeah the problem is we only get 3 sessions, zero practice. And I'm going to assume someone in our group will crash, so will get 2 sessions to learn a track. Just want to be fast right out of the gate.
    @9literviper 2013 track car, 2016 ACR, 1996 GTS, 2001 RT/10, 2003 SRT/10

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    To get more comfortable with walls, drive a small car through highway work zones with portable traffic barriers. Get right next to them for as far as you are able. Don't do it in your Viper because there can be a good bit of debris buildup that could damage tires and rims. Maybe use a Vette - nobody cares about them...:lol:.
    96 GTS. Viper Days Modified Class. Fresh motor 10-2020!

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    Practice usually goes ok. Race pro or amateur can be a crash fest or an absolute disaster first lap and 2 laps from finish. Being the fastest guy on track is not your big concern staying out of trouble is.
    If you have a bad fast car in qualify then up front is where you can stay all day. If the car isnt so good then top 5 is where you want to be so your in position to take advantage. Get comfortable quick. Getting comfortable at an unfamiliar track quickly is a skill you have to practice alot to get good at it. Having a crew that can make correct changes with little to no practice pays off big. Also another skill that always needs lots of practice. If your going in completely blind to a new track especially a street course soft baseline the car and work from there. If you keep your head during the race and are consistent Im sure you will do well.

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    Funny enough they just posted a lap comparison from another major street circuit:
    -2008 Venom Red ACR Hardcore


 

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