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  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocket View Post
    First question - are you using a hand torque wrench and what torque are you setting to?
    I've made the typical mistakes of letting my cordless impact slam the lug home for a second too long. Normally I start the lug by hand, thread it several times, then run it up with the impact until it snugs lightly, drop the car, then torque with a handheld torque wrench to 110 ftlb.
    I've definitely let the impact click over 2-3 times.
    I've also torqued to 110 ftlb after a hard track session while hot (don't know anyway around this than to use a much lower torque value and 'guess'?)
    And then lots of track use on top.

    Going forward I'm only running up the lugs with the impact on setting 1 and stopping short of snug. I'm also breaking the lugs loose by hand not by the impact. And I think I'm settling on about 90-95 ftlb of torque with frequent checks after track sessions.
    2017 ACR-E
    2004 Lambo Murcielago -- Gated Manual, 2004 Challenge Stradale
    2018 991.2 GT3 -- Manual, 2019 Raptor

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonDan View Post
    I've made the typical mistakes of letting my cordless impact slam the lug home for a second too long. Normally I start the lug by hand, thread it several times, then run it up with the impact until it snugs lightly, drop the car, then torque with a handheld torque wrench to 110 ftlb.
    I've definitely let the impact click over 2-3 times.
    I've also torqued to 110 ftlb after a hard track session while hot (don't know anyway around this than to use a much lower torque value and 'guess'?)
    And then lots of track use on top.

    Going forward I'm only running up the lugs with the impact on setting 1 and stopping short of snug. I'm also breaking the lugs loose by hand not by the impact. And I think I'm settling on about 90-95 ftlb of torque with frequent checks after track sessions.
    I run 80lbs with my titanium lugnuts and torque between sessions. I also finger start then run them down to barely snug and then hand torque. I usually always use a breakaway bar to loosen initially but then the gun to zip them off.

  3. #28
    Enthusiast Hawk's Avatar
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    If you use the impact gun to install the first lug nut you are applying a lot of pressure to the stud if you are using the nut to pull the wheel to the hub because the tires are wide and it is pulling it in at an angle. If you are using a gun to just to snug them up hold the wheel tight to the hub with your knees so it is flat before hitting it with the gun. Stop the gun before it starts clicking (or use a cordless drill that has adjustable torque settings) . Tighten in a star formation . I always tighten by hand, hit them at 85 FT/LBS. and then hit them a second time at the 107 ft/lbs. When removing them with a gun crack them loose by hand, hold the tire tight to the hub with your knees and loosen them up with the gun, remember using speed with a gun creates heat in the stud.
    2014 TA orange #55

  4. #29
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    Is it worth it to punch the studs out? I'd just get a new hub and install new studs. Hubs are a high wear item for any track car anyway. I'd maybe punch the studs out later and keep as a track side spare.

    I torque 88ftlbs, no more, checked every session, never had an issue. I do, however, use a tiny bit of copper grease on the studs*. You may want to consider the same. The studs in the picture look bone dry. It's something I always did when working for Ferrari years ago so I carried it over to everything I work on.

    *lubed torque is lower than dry torque
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbonDan View Post
    I've made the typical mistakes of letting my cordless impact slam the lug home for a second too long. Normally I start the lug by hand, thread it several times, then run it up with the impact until it snugs lightly, drop the car, then torque with a handheld torque wrench to 110 ftlb.
    I've definitely let the impact click over 2-3 times.
    I've also torqued to 110 ftlb after a hard track session while hot (don't know anyway around this than to use a much lower torque value and 'guess'?)
    And then lots of track use on top.

    Going forward I'm only running up the lugs with the impact on setting 1 and stopping short of snug. I'm also breaking the lugs loose by hand not by the impact. And I think I'm settling on about 90-95 ftlb of torque with frequent checks after track sessions.
    I do 80 ft/lbs. If you are a track guy and check them often, that's more than enough. 110 is for people that would never check them, only after 30,000 miles getting new tires lol.
    I know a lot of guys with Gen 5's that have broke lug nuts, I never have broke one and there's nobody that has swapped wheels on a Gen 5 more than me.
    @9literviper 2013 track car, 2016 ACR, 1996 GTS, 2001 RT/10, 2003 SRT/10

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arizona Vipers View Post
    I do 80 ft/lbs. If you are a track guy and check them often, that's more than enough. 110 is for people that would never check them, only after 30,000 miles getting new tires lol.
    I know a lot of guys with Gen 5's that have broke lug nuts, I never have broke one and there's nobody that has swapped wheels on a Gen 5 more than me.
    lol I bet you're correct.

    I've never broken a stud either.

  7. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Viper98 View Post
    Yes, absolutely, write up and document. Always room for more info.

    Thank you sir
    So I completed the job on the 2 front wheels and it was a right pain in the ass. I started to document the process but dropped that not too long in.
    Short answer is - these ARP lugs "Wheel Stud ARP Racing Long 3" Lug Bolt Viper 92-17 × 30" are way too long for the ACR-E, and what happens is that any sort of slight angle you had in the stud when pressing it into place gets amplified over that excessively long distance - net result is the brake rotor doesn't have enough clearance in it to accomodate the exaggerated angles of the studs.

    And so began the process of removing and repeatedly trying to reseat the studs to get them to sit straight.

    Result was: broken 6" vice, shattered Lissle 22800 tool, multiple broken studs and lugs, and damaged threads on the studs that did finally line up enough, finally got the fronts on and got the brake rotor to slide on (had to basically force it on and it sheared some of the threads off the new studs in the process, fortunately the nuts still thread and hold perfectly.

    So moral of the story is, don't get 3" studs for a stock ACR-E, unless you have spacers or other reasons to go that long.


    I used a 'metal cutter' dremel attachment to slice the notch into the ARP studs so that I could start the pressing/pulling through process without any angular pressure on the stud. Every tactic I tried to pull the studs through, they just wouldn't sit 100% straight. Easiest way was get it started with a few light taps with a hammer, then zip it through with lissle tool and an impact. Lissle tool shattered after about 12-15 uses. The stud face would be sitting what looked like perfectly flat against the back of the hub, but any slight angle grows over that distance.
    Tried using my vise to 'press' them into place, and completely shattered the vise, a huge chunk of metal where the worm gear drives it cracked off, it basically cracked in half.

    OEMTOOLS 27276 Tie Rod End Remover works perfectly, just take a dremel to it to open it up a 1-2 mm to get enough clearance for it to fit around the stud head. Pushes the old studs out with ease (note, the ARPs are so damn long that the only way to get them out will be with a hammer!)

    Going forward, when those hubs are ready for preemptive replacement at the end of this season, I'm going to replace them with new OEM hubs and bearings, and will likely just go with OEM studs (which come out and go in like an absolute breeze), will use antiseize, and a much lower torque value, with more diligence to ensure I don't impact them in place at all.

    1 thumb down for the ARPs for being too long (my problem, not theirs) and also for requiring notching.
    1 thumb up for the ARPs for withstanding some heavy impacting without snapping (yet).



    Just to circle back with brief instructions - getting the hubs off the front is really fast and easy (under 20 mins).
    Jack up, remove wheel, remove 2 hex bolts holding brake caliper in place (85 ftlb to reinstall). Set caliper aside SUPPORTED, not hanging by the lines.
    Remove brake rotor.
    On the back of the hub there are 4 hex bolts, I believe 15mm or so. Remove those (45 ftlb to reinstall).
    On the back, very center of the hub (inside side) there's a torx bit, smaller torx. It hooks the ABS tone wheel to the hub. Remove that --- DON'T need to remove the giant ~33mm nut holding the bearing in there, just remove the torx bit on the backside (might need to put a 33mm bit on the hub just to prevent it from rotating while you remove it).
    At that point the hub is completely free.
    Torx tone wheel bolt is 13 ftlb to reinstall.
    Last edited by CarbonDan; 08-01-2021 at 05:50 PM.
    2017 ACR-E
    2004 Lambo Murcielago -- Gated Manual, 2004 Challenge Stradale
    2018 991.2 GT3 -- Manual, 2019 Raptor


 
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