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  1. #1

    Moton Coilover Air Preload

    You can run the air charge as high as 320PSI. Is there a conversion of PSI to added spring rate???

    I have looked and can't the data. Anyone???

    At 225 PSI it feels like the 1000lbs Gen 4 ACR but that could just be the rebound and compression I have set in.

    Thanks in advance.
    You can teach a dog to fetch, therefore you teach a potato to dance! “Amazingly Bad Analogy”

  2. #2
    Enthusiast Steve M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Dayton, OH
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    4,658
    I've never seen that exact info.

    I run my MCS shocks at 175 psi. If your Motons are anything like mine, small adjustments in compression make a BIG difference. I run compression on mine up one click from full soft on the street, which seems to be a good balance between control and a nice ride. Rebound is set around the middle if I recall correctly.
    2008 SRT-10 Coupe - Venom Red Metallic w/ White Stripes - 1/4 Mile Passes (YouTube)
    High Flow Cats | Gen 5 Intake Man. | UDP | HPT | 3.55s | MCS | DSS Axles | Nth Moto Clutch | 10.86 @ 130.66, 1.68 60' (+1,344 ft DA, w/ 3.55s & Hoosier Drag Radials)

  3. #3
    From the Moton Site
    https://motonsuspensionusa.com/colle...cd-5x100-gg-gd

    FEATURES

    Separate Bump (15) and rebound (15) control
    Ride height adjustable
    Unique blow off valve system in remote reservoirs
    Large piston rod diameter for more fluid displacement
    Adjustable gas pressure for added lifting force
    Canister pressure can be varied between 6-16 BARÂ (100-300 psi)
    Variable canister pressure helps support the car in high speed cornering with soft springs
    Large main piston for quick response
    No pre-loaded valve stacks needed for low speed damping control
    Swivel banjo hoses for easy installation of remote reservoirs
    DDP (double digressive pistons) are available as an option


    I am looking for number, Lbs/inch, without having to put the shocks on a dyno.
    You can teach a dog to fetch, therefore you teach a potato to dance! “Amazingly Bad Analogy”

  4. #4
    Member
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    TKO MOTORSPORTS TEAM's Avatar
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    Jul 2019
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    Adjusting nitro pressure is not a very common thing to do. Usually if we are adjusting nitro pressure its for specific set up at a specific track; Places like Daytona where your running on high banks, or if your trying to pass tech for minimum ride height and you need the car to stand up going through tech. Only way to really adjust nitro pressure correctly and apply it to your application is with a shock dyno and track testing.

    150-170psi are the most common pressures to run and will offer best performance and shock reliability.

  5. #5
    Copy I guess I'll build a shock dyno.
    Thanks
    You can teach a dog to fetch, therefore you teach a potato to dance! “Amazingly Bad Analogy”

  6. #6
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    TKO MOTORSPORTS TEAM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pokeyl View Post
    Copy I guess I'll build a shock dyno.
    Thanks
    We have a few shock dynos if you ever need help, want to see how your shocks are performing.


 

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